I gotta have my orange juice.

Jesu, Juva

Metábasis eis állo génos (2-29)

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Another pair of things that we must hold together is the distinction between sin and foolishness, or between salvation and maturity.

It is possible to fail to hold these things together rightly by calling foolishness a sin. But it is also possible to fail by exonerating foolishness; it isn’t sin, so shouldn’t we lighten up? No; God considers that to be fully righteous is to be wise:

​​The mouth of the righteous speaks wisdom,
And his tongue talks of justice.
​​The law of his God is in his heart;
​​None of his steps shall slide. (Psalm 37:30–31, NKJV)

Satan is glad to confuse the church in many different ways, but one significant way he is attacking the evangelical church today is to accommodate and even glorify foolishness and immaturity. This has a veneer of plausibility since we want the hypothetical immature Christian to really enjoy the forgiveness they have in Jesus. But we also want them to mature, and calling them to wisdom and maturity does not call their salvation into question—rather, it calls them to make the most of their salvation and Savior.

Foolishness may not be a sin, but its careful cultivation definitely is. No one is ever static; if we become practiced in foolishness, sin will be the resultant fruit. Likewise if we accommodate foolishness, accommodation of sin is not far behind. The tyranny of the weak may earn us the quick approval of the world, but at the cost of our saltiness and the approval of our Savior.

This plays out in many different ways. Even if we granted for the sake of argument all of the antecedents in this list, none of the consequents follow:

  • Someone might at some time be permitted to wear this outfit; therefore it is good for me to wear it here and now
  • Someone might at some time be permitted to send their children to public school; therefore it is good for me to do so
  • At times a wife and mother might be permitted to work outside the home; therefore it is good for me to do so
  • Churches at some times might be permitted to close their doors on Sunday; therefore it is good for us to do so now
  • Jesus might permit us to wear masks in worship; therefore it is good for me to do so
  • Jesus might permit us to delay the baptism of our children; therefore it is good for me to do so
  • Jesus understands that at times his church may not be able to celebrate his supper every week; therefore it is good for us to do so
  • Jesus understands that at times his church may not be able to use wine in celebrating his supper; therefore it is good for us to do so
  • Someone might at some time be permitted to stay home from church; therefore it is good for me to do so today

What is permissible, what is good, and what is best are not the same. This is applicable within the church, but also for parents; we are responsible to disciple our children to maturity. As Sproul points out, Paul’s principle is not merely one of accommodating the weak brother. Paul’s goal for us and for the weak brother is to avoid that which is unprofitable, to edify:

All things are lawful for me, but not all things are helpful; all things are lawful for me, but not all things edify. (1 Corinthians 10:23, NKJV)

There is an infantile kind of mere Christianity that is content to remain mere; let us instead be the kind that runs—and invites!—further up and further in.

I mentioned that suffering and deformity were the special mark of God’s secret agents. Luther describes how God presents himself to us through a variety of masks; in the same way, we are often the mask of God toward others.

Overheard on Slack:

GM Steve.
Oops wrong channel… anyway if you are Steve, good morning.

Written by Scott Moonen

July 18, 2021 at 1:17 pm

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